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Golf Course Ettiquette

Today I would like to explore the old golf idea of "A Gentlemen's Game" from what I saw on Monday.  The standard conduct/etiquette on a golf course has been lost of the years, pictured is a 100 yard stake that was broke on Monday.  Bad shots are a part of this game, there is no need to take it out on course equipment.  I spend an average of $1,000 a year on broken yardage stakes, missing flags and poles, broken landscape timbers, busted signage and broken rake handles.  I go through $400 alone in replacing these markers, it seems that golfers rely on them for selecting the proper club.  I could just eliminate the markers due to cost or option 2, raising rates, no one likes to hear that. 

Golf has become a competitive game over the last 15 years, with golf carts, range finders, GPS systems, PGA tournament conditions, Tiger Woods and hitting into the slow group in front of you, the basics of etiquette has been lost.  Golfers are like sheep, if one person does it the rest will follow, whether it is driving a cart  to the collar/tee's edge, hydroplaining through water puddles, take the ball out of the cup with your putter head not your hand and bad language.  One comment I hear constantly is  the amount of ball marks and divots on the course, who is accountable is it the maintenance department or the golfer themselves, its both.  Accountability is the key componet for keeping a course in good condition, goal is for everyone to have an enjoyable experience no matter what time of day.   We want to bring the fun back to the game but also respect the game to what it deserves.  The next time you go golfing take a few seconds and replace the divot/ball mark and walk to the green or tee area from the cart path, the maintenance staff will tip our helmets to you along with setting a good example for other to follow.

Next month (May) Currie will open its new driving range, does anyone know about driving range etiquette.  WHAT; is their such a thing! Answer is yes.  I learned it when I was an assistant superintendent trying to improving my game,  The basics include returning your basket back to the collection area, repecting other peoples space on the range, not targeting the employee that is picking the range and the most important how to it off the range tee.  The proper way is to hit off the range tee is to use of a square foot area of turf leaving penty of turf the next person or two or three.  It is easier for the maintenance staff to fill and to grow in rather than having diviots spread out everywhere in your hitting station.  I will have more on this later as we get closer to opening. Thank you.